YouTube Will End Community Contributions Feature After September 28

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YouTube is our go-to source of consuming video content. Thanks to the enormous number of content creators, there is no shortage of videos on YouTube. You can search for videos on almost any topic that you could think of. Over the years, Google has updated the features of the YouTube website as well as the app. However, one feature that is soon going to end is the YouTube community contributions. These contributions are published only after getting enough community reviews.

YouTube allows users to create subtitles, descriptions, and closed captions (CC) for any creator's video. This thereby helped the creators to reach more users who do not speak their language, create a well-informed description, and much more. But this feature is going down after September 28, 2020. As per the official post, a company spokesperson said that this feature failed to create enough traction. Moreover, the YouTube community contribution feature was used by the users for low quality submissions.

And since its usage is declining, YouTube will terminate this feature after September 28. Going by the post, "Both creators and viewers have reported problems with the community contributions feature, including spam, abuse, and low quality submissions. As a result, the feature is rarely used with less than 0.001% of channels having published community captions (showing on less than 0.2% of watch time) in the last month. Instead, creators are using YouTube’s alternative captioning tools."

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YouTube Community-contributions already posted will continue to show up

Fortunately, the contributions that are already posted before the deadline will continue to show up. Meanwhile, the contributions saved as drafts will be available for the next 60 days, until September 28. So, users can publish their contributions before the said date.

"If you have contributions currently saved as drafts, these will be available for the next 60 days (until Sept 28 2020), and you have until then to publish them before they’re removed," the spokesperson added.

Besides, the only option left for the creators is to rely on Google's built-in automatic caption feature. However, as many of the contributors rely on contributions, the creators will get six-months subscription to captioning service Amara. "We’ve also obtained special pricing and benefits from additional third party vendors, who can assist with caption, translation, and subtitle needs. We have a list of these partners in our Help Center."

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For creators who wish to use third-party vendors for captions, subtitles, and more can head over here to know about the official list of partners.